Events

Making of a Black Man Presented by Teach For America in Conjunction with Progressive Black Men of FAMU and FSU

Join Us! 
Wednesday, February 25th, 7-9 PM 

FAMU Village 
4th Floor Game Room 
667 Gamble St. 
Tallahassee, FL 32307 

A Night of Music, Food and Discussion! 
Black Men of FAMU and FSU: Come engage with Teach For America and Alumni Leaders. The “Making of A Black Man” event aims to challenge campus brothers to engage one another and alumni on critical topics pertaining to success through an interactive fair and keynote address. We aim to honor a student leader who exemplifies a commitment to addressing the unique challenges of our community. This event is open to all students.

#ChooseMore

I Am My Brother Black Leadership Summit - Atlanta

Atlanta, GA

Location: Teach For America ATL Regional Office

Date: Fri Feb 20- Sat Feb 21, 9am - 5pm

The “I Am My Brother Black Leadership Summit” convenes some of the most promising leaders for an intensive two-day leadership journey. This all-expense paid summit courageously speaks to the need for Black Men in the fight  to end educational equity, especially given the disproportionate impact such inequity plays in our community.  Summit attendees can expect dynamic activities, site visits and speaker panel engagements. Through this summit, we aspire to build community, knowledge and skills around the challenges facing our community and the leadership role that we are uniquely positioned to play individually and collectively, if we are prepared. Through the lens of education, we will interrogate our own trajectories and identities, our collective relationship to the national and local education system and equip ourselves to address the issue in the short and long term. The summit aims to inform, inspire and propel Black Men to  proclaim, “I are more than my brother’s keeper, I am my brother!”

Summit Attendees will be selected by Feb 9th. To apply, please click the registration button to the right. 

Join the “I Am My Brother” Black Male Facebook Group 

The State of Education in the Black Community

Tuesday, 2/17, 8PM-9PM ET

In celebration of Black History Month this online event will highlight education – in and out of the classroom - as the foundation of the recent events in the community, for all Americans, and how this shapes the black experience. Host, Tomeka Hart, VP of Programs for The Southern Education Foundation in Atlanta, will highlight the events of this past year and how they’ve impacted our students, regardless of race. Learn how you can help challenge educational inequity and address these issues with Teach For America.

RSVP HERE

Download the flyer

I Am My Brother Black Leadership Summit - Washington, DC

Washington D.C.

Location: Teach For America DC Regional Office
 
Date: Fri. Feb 27- Sat. Feb 28, 9am - 5pm

The “I Am My Brother Black Leadership Summit” convenes some of the most promising leaders for an intensive two-day leadership journey. This all-expense paid summit courageously speaks to the need for Black Men in the fight  to end educational equity, especially given the disproportionate impact such inequity plays in our community.  Summit attendees can expect dynamic activities, site visits and speaker panel engagements. Through this summit, we aspire to build community, knowledge and skills around the challenges facing our community and the leadership role that we are uniquely positioned to play individually and collectively, if we are prepared. Through the lens of education, we will interrogate our own trajectories and identities, our collective relationship to the national and local education system and equip ourselves to address the issue in the short and long term. The summit aims to inform, inspire and propel Black Men to  proclaim, “I are more than my brother’s keeper, I am my brother!”

Summit Attendees will be selected by Feb 9th. To apply, please click the registration button to the right. 

Join the “I Am My Brother” Black Male Facebook Group 

Choose Your Legacy

Black men make up just two percent of our country’s teaching workforce, meaning most students will encounter few, if any, black male teachers in their lifetimes.

Students, schools, and the system are missing out on more than just educators. Because “teacher” doesn’t begin to define the roles black men can play in the classroom.

Read To Learn More

These recommended reads will build your knowledge about educational inequity.

Watch To Learn More

Watch these films to get an inside look at the state of education, beyond the statistics.